213: The Art of Savoring: How to Invite the Skill of Savoring Into Our Lives

~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #213 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | YouTube | Spotify “Alone, we can plumb local markets and examine their wares closely. We can breathe in and relish the flavors in a sauce, or the coolness of a pitcher of cream. We don’t necessarily take time to do these things in the presence of company, […] Listen now or continue reading below.
~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #213
~Subscribe to The Simple SophisticateiTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | YouTube | Spotify

“Alone, we can plumb local markets and examine their wares closely. We can breathe in and relish the flavors in a sauce, or the coolness of a pitcher of cream. We don’t necessarily take time to do these things in the presence of company, particularly during lively conversation. A solo meal is an opportunity to go slow; to savor.”

—Stephanie Rosenbloom, Alone Time

Discovering an enticing book and being delighting with the contents even more than expected, wanting the pages, vivid images and revelations to continue beyond the last chapter. Experiencing a day long anticipated that unfolds seamlessly, exceeding expectation. Sitting down for a meal bursting with precisely paired flavors which make it all but impossible not to solely absorb and beg your memory to remember each moment of the experience.

Savoring, as Stephanie Rosenbloom shares in her new book about solo traveling, has been long recognized by social scientists to be one of a number of ways to enhance our levels of happiness. And psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky shares the benefits of becoming skilled in savoring, “People who become skilled at ‘capturing the joy of the present moment’, are also ‘less likely to experience depression, stress, guilt and shame.” Okay, the skill of savoring, count me in! Now let’s talk about how exactly to invite more opportunities to savor into our everyday lives.

1.Become acutely aware of all of the goodness in each moment

Citing Fred B. Bryant’s book Savoring: A New Model of Positive Experiencewe must come to be able to recognize when we are experiencing an positive moment. And in the moment “aim for the most joy to be found”. That is the definition of savoring.

2. Utilize all of your senses

Rosenbloom cites Julia Child enjoying her first meal in France at La Couronne in Rouen and Poilâne founder’s granddaughter as precise examples of becoming aware of what each sense is experiencing. From what something not only looks like, but smells, feels, sounds and tastes like.

3. Take your time

When we rush, we miss out. We miss the butterfly dancing around our nose, the passersby’s exquisite sartorial taste displayed in the most subtle, but creative manner, and the scent of the boulangerie’s freshly made bread in the morning as we walk to work. Savoring requires of us to slow down, to reduce the amount of “to-do”s and prioritize what we truly need as well as want to do. When we edit well, we live well as it permits us time to be fully present. And when we are full present, we are able to pause, observe the detail in the pastry we are looking forward to enjoying, but appreciating the artistry and attention to detail that was spent.

4. Give your full attention

Case in point, in order to savor, we must be in the moment, we must not be distracted. Not only must we not be distracted by our phones, but our minds and the ideas and thoughts that swirl about. Of course, we should use our minds and when we get lost in our minds, we can discover the most creative ideas we never thought would be possible, but when we are experiencing a positive moment, choose to set the thoughts aside and soak up all that the current experience is offering you.

5. Let go of habits that don’t enhance opportunities for savoring

In some instances, adhering to habits can be a truly beneficial concept to welcome into your life, but it is imperative to examine closely the habits you follow. Rosenbloom suggests letting go of “multi-tasking, worrying, latching on to what’s wrong or negative, and ruminating about the past or future.”

6. Focus on what you want and you’ll find it more often

In order to find something to savor, we must look for it, desire it, imagine it, come to understand it. And if we are thinking about positive outcomes and experiences, we are more likely to come across them in the present moment.

7. Limit how often you let your mind wander

According to a study conducted by Matthew A. Killingsworth, A Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society scholar, and Harvard psychologist Daniel T. Gilbert, “one of the strongest predictors of happiness is whether or not your attention is focused where you are in the present . . . people are substantially less happy when their minds are wandering than when they’re not.”

8. Appreciate every moment as finite

When we recognize that any moment is precisely that – a moment – the skill of “temporal awareness” Rosenbloom states heightens our ability to savor and thus our enjoyment of said moment. For example, today we have three more days of spring. Why not do something in the next three days that you will not be able to do when summer arrives? Drink up this activity, relish it, get lost in it, so that when summer arrives you can know you drank up all that spring offered and are ready to be fully present in the new season.

9. Plan ahead to appreciate the event even more

Studies have also revealed that planning well ahead of any trip or event heightens the appreciation when it arrives as well as our happiness leading up to it in anticipation. The recognition of the work and effort paid to make the plans and either bring people together or attain a particular experience. So upon being in the moment (the trip or the event), we are more readily prepared to be present and savor the experience.

While Rosenbloom’s book is focused on travel, and specifically solo travel, when we welcome the skill of savoring into our everyday lives, we begin to enhance the quality, reduce the need to cling and trust that we will be able to find something to savor each day – some may be grander than others, but each offers a gift to experience happiness.

Ultimately, when we acquire the skill of savoring, we are creating a memory in our minds, a file of sorts of our experiences from each day, trip or event, so that when we want to get lost in our past in a positive way, we can recall the beauty that we had experienced, and thus be encouraged about how amazing our life has been and will continue to be.

And so last Friday on the concluding day of school and the commencement of summer holiday, I put into practice the skill of savoring. The boys and I went to a local bakery, found a cozy seat and table outside, ordered tea and pastry, and just took in the beautiful weather, the temporal company and a very good book. It was something I knew I wouldn’t experiencing for another 12 months and I did my best to soak it up in its entirety.

~SIMILAR POSTS FROM THE ARCHIVES YOU MIGHT ENJOY:

~9 Reasons to Savor Begin in the “Choosing Seat”: The Gift of Being Single in Your 30s, 40s, 50s and Beyond, episode #199

~Why Not . . . Savor the Reasons for the Season?

~Learn How to Truly Savor Everyday Moments & Watch It Elevate Your Life, episode #163

~Why Not . . . Savor Life? 

 

Petit Plaisir:

~Ocean’s 8

 

 

~SPONSORS of Today’s Episode:

  • Troos skincare & apothecary – www.troosskin.com
    • promo code: SIMPLE for 30% off your purchase



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