My Daily Breakfast: Steel Cut Oats

Apr 17, 2016

stelloats

The fewer decisions our minds have to make in the morning, the better. When we can eliminate the unnecessary decisions that can become habituated and trusted, we can focus our energy on the demands of the day that are either unexpected or demanding of our full attention. This reality is precisely why I began eating the same breakfast nearly each day of the week more than four years ago.

Initially, it may sound like a blah approach to food. However, as someone who loves cooking, attempting new recipes and trying new meals at restaurants, this daily decision is not a slight, but rather an approach to ensure I eat well, am fully satiated and love what I’m eating.

And it all begins with a little bit of butter . . .

Buttery Steel Cut Oats

What is the difference between steel cut oats and rolled oats or other instant oatmeal products?

  • It’s all about the processing, there is less of it in steel cut oats
  • Due to less processing, it takes longer to cook steel cut oats, but this is what makes the difference and it’s worth it for your health

Benefits of eating steel cut oats:

  • stay full longer
    • due to the low glycemic index and high fiber count (7 grams  per 1/4 cup serving, you feel full longer)
  • helps prevent diabetes
    • due its low glycemic index. The Glycemic index is a measure of how much a carbohydrate raises blood-glucose levels. Low levels help maintain a balanced blood-glucose level
  • reduce risk of heart disease
    • rich in dietary fiber (1/4 cup contains 5 grams of fiber and 2 grams of insoluble fiber, 15% of recommended daily allowance for healthy adults). In a Nurses’ Health Study following 70,000 women for 10 yrs, their risk of coronary disease was decreased as it inhibits the absorption of cholesterol and lower LDL, otherwise known as bad cholesterol.
  • reduce blood pressure
  • check iron and vitamin B intake off your list
    • receive 10% of your daily allowance of iron and B vitamins in 1/4 cup

(sources: here and here)

Print Recipe
Buttery Steel Cut Oats
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup steel cut oats Bob’s Red Mill Organic or McCann’s Original Irish (original, not quick cooking)
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream or whole milk (optional) If you don't want diary included, add 1/4 cup more boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter (top quality, I use Sèvre & Belle, but read this article on why French butter is so lovely and find a list of butters to shop for in your market)
  • Topping options are endless I prefer roasted, unsalted, sliced almonds, raisins and honey.
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup steel cut oats Bob’s Red Mill Organic or McCann’s Original Irish (original, not quick cooking)
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream or whole milk (optional) If you don't want diary included, add 1/4 cup more boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter (top quality, I use Sèvre & Belle, but read this article on why French butter is so lovely and find a list of butters to shop for in your market)
  • Topping options are endless I prefer roasted, unsalted, sliced almonds, raisins and honey.
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Place 1 tablespoon of butter in a skillet with 1/4 cup of steel oats over medium heat to toast the oats. This will take about 2 minutes.
  2. While the oats are toasting, bring to boil your tea kettle.
  3. When the tea kettle is singing (water is boiling), measure 3/4 cup of hot water in a liquid measuring cup. Pour directly over the oats once they are toasted. This will cause the oats and water to boil. As soon as they are boiling, reduce the heat to simmer (low – medium).
  4. Do not mix, do not touch, let sit for about 7-10 minutes. Add a pinch of sea salt. The oats will absorb the water.
  5. When the water has been absorbed to your liking, pour in heavy cream or whole milk (no more than 1/4 cup, but 1/8 cup works well too, depending upon your taste). Mix in over low heat. Then let the dairy be absorbed. Remove from the heat when the consistency is to your liking.
  6. Place into a bowl and top with your favorite fruit, nuts, natural sugars, etc.
  7. Enjoy!
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19 thoughts on “My Daily Breakfast: Steel Cut Oats

  1. Gosh I’ll be trying that in the cooler weather Shannon, I remember Mum adding butter to our porridge when we were little. The Scots do that I believe?

    In warmer weather I make up a big jar of muesli — uncooked oats, dried fruit and raw nuts then soak a serving overnight in a little water. Served with yoghurt or milk it’s a light nourishing breakfast for hotter weather.

  2. I can’t get my kid to eat oatmeal, so I started making muffins with oatmeal. Basically, they are zucchini bread/carrot cake without sugar and with whole wheat flour and oatmeal instead of white flour. I make a batch and freeze them, then thaw a couple for breakfast. Veggies + oatmeal for breakfast. I put a recipe on my blog and have been working on variations that I’ll post soon.

  3. I’ve also been expiramenting with eating the same breakfast/lunch every day. I have a smoothie for breakfast (usually green) and a salad and bread (sourdough from an organic bakery down the street) for lunch. I also might have a few raw nuts or half a homemade muffin if I am feeling especially hungry at some point during the morning. I created a salad recipe full of things I love (like goat cheese, avocado, dried cranberries, etc) and I make a honey dijon salad dressing. I never get tired of that salad! This past weekend I skipped the cheese and bread and added some tuna. It’s simple, it’s healthy and it has become routine now. Then if I want pizza and chocolate for dinner who’s to stop me!

  4. I browned my steel cut oats in butter this morning – what a fantastic suggestion, and worth the extra step! Served with my typical dash of lavender salt from The Meadow, splash of heavy cream, walnuts and strawberries…. delicious way to start the day.

    Thank you for another lovely post, Shannon.

  5. I just want to say thank you so much for posting this recipe. I vaguely remember trying to cook McCann’s Steel Cut Oats once upon a time, and it never seemed “done”, it was very hard and chewy. Is that normal?

    1. Not necessarily. Cooking style oats takes time, but it will never be the texture of rolled oats/oatmeal. Let the water be fully absorbed as well as the dairy and it shouldn’t be too chewy. Hope that helps.

  6. One egg is un oeuf – that cracked me up! ?

    So looking forward to trying steel oats this way, thanks for the recipe!

  7. Thanks for sharing this Shannon. I’ve been having this for breakfast over the past 2 weeks and am really enjoying it. It holds me over until lunch (I was starving by 10am with my old breakfast)! I can’t wait to share this with house guests when they come visit!

  8. I love steel cut oats! My preparation method is very, very simple, as I leave for work every morning before 6. I simply place the oats in a glass bowl and cover with boiling water and a dash sea salt. Then I refrigerate overnight. In the morning, I microwave for 30 seconds or so, just enough to warm them. The overnight soak does all the softening/cooking. So easy!

  9. Hi Shannon–I love oatmeal of all kinds, but my husband doesn’t care much for it. You have such a different way of preparing steel cut oats, and I was excited to try your recipe this morning. My husband was behind my shoulder, curiously watching, while I made my breakfast, and I offered him a bite when it was finished. He really liked it! I’m so glad to have an oatmeal recipe that he and I can enjoy together. Thank you.

    1. Maureen, That is great news!!! So happy you both enjoyed it. It took me some time to hone this recipe, but I too love it and indulge with the heavy cream on the weekends and the water on the workdays. Both are delicious and it really has so much to do with the toasting of the oats in butter. Enjoy and thank you for sharing. 🙂

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